USDA Announces Details of Direct Assistance to Farmers through Coronavirus Food Assistance Program

Louisiana Commissioner of Agriculture and Forestry Mike Strain, D.V.M., said the USDA has announced details of the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program (CFAP). CFAP will provide up to $16 billion in direct payments to America’s farmers and ranchers who suffered losses during the coronavirus pandemic.

“In these challenging times, we have refocused our attention on the critical importance of food and fiber. The work never stops for our agricultural producers, yet many face financial hardships as restaurants closed and food we would normally export across the world, was ground to a halt,” said Strain. “Anytime we can help our ag producers, who are the backbone of our economy, we show our appreciation for their hard work and resilience. It is imperative that we assist them so they can continue to provide us the safest and most affordable food in the world.”

In addition, USDA’s Farmers to Families Food Box program is partnering with regional and local distributors. That program will benefit workforces significantly impacted by the closure of restaurants, hotels and food service entities by purchasing $3 billion in fresh produce, dairy and meat for those in need.

Beginning May 26, the USDA, through the Farm Service Agency (FSA), will be accepting applications from agricultural producers who have suffered losses.

There is a payment limitation of $250,000 per person or entity for all commodities combined.

Producers of all eligible commodities will apply through their local FSA office. Additional information and application forms can be found at farmers.gov/cfap.

My Opinion – With Prudence, We Must Fully Reopen Now

By Royal Alexander

As Americans and Louisianans, we have had it explained to us, perhaps hundreds of times by now, that we must address this virus with caution and prudence. We’ve had indelibly imprinted into our minds the need to social distance, wear masks, vigorously wash hands and disinfect with a religious fervor. The large majority of us, no doubt out of concern for our families and neighbors, have implemented some, if not all, of these measures. Wisely so. However, we are now at the point that by continuing to limit and hamstring our economy, we are risking fundamental damage to it. We have to remember that it is a strong American economy that not only powers our country and our way of life, but also provides us with the means to render aid across the world—as we are now doing, for example, in assisting many other nations with medical knowledge, resources and supplies to fight the virus. A strong, vibrant economy, therefore, is nothing less than the lifeblood of our American way of life. It always has been.

I put aside for purposes of this article the sweeping and often incoherent restrictions of our civil liberties we are enduring and note that, at a time such as this, when we feel anxious and overwhelmed, it’s easy for us to forget an important fact: government can render aid, information and recommendations as to defeating this virus but it cannot fundamentally restore our economy; government creates nothing; manufactures nothing; is not an entrepreneur. It’s not supposed to be, but neither is it supposed to inhibit the efforts of those who do create jobs and wealth. Its legitimate role in our lives is to, within the specific limits of the power our Constitution grants it, create an environment in which the opportunity exists for all of us to thrive with hard work and commitment. That is why, when government acts, it is doing so based upon the taxes it has extracted (a power granted under Article I, Section 8) from us. Simply, it has taken the fruits of the labor of millions of Americans and made, ideally through our elected leadership, policy determinations about where that wealth and those resources should be deployed—as it’s doing now with trillions of dollars to fight the virus. That’s the deal. For this reason, when we undermine our national, state and local economies such that we strangle and crush this vibrant, wealth and job-creating economic engine, we put ourselves in peril. At some point, government will run out of our money. I’m not even certain we can defeat this health crisis without a strong economy. As U.S. Sen. John Kennedy has succinctly noted, this virus is bad but poverty and economic devastation are also bad.

America is great not only because America reflects the values that we do; America is great because our economic strength, via our free market system, has created and sustained the very best way of life that’s ever been devised. We have flattened the curve, hospitals will not likely be overwhelmed (some field hospitals have never had even one virus patient) and, while we should do so with prudence, we must fully reopen and unleash our economy now.

The views and opinions expressed in the My Opinion article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of The Winn Parish Journal. Any content provided by the authors are of their opinion and are not intended to malign any religion, ethnic group, club, organization, company, individual or anyone or anything.

Louisiana Wild Turkey Hunting Season Sees Uptick in Harvest

The recently completed 2020 wild turkey hunting season saw the largest reported harvest of birds since 2011, with 2,117 turkeys harvested based on required tag validation data, the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) announced.

The season, which ran from April 4-May 3, was held during the current COVID-19 pandemic and was impacted by flooding along the Mississippi River, forcing the closure of seasons on some LDWF Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs).

The 2020 season harvest saw a 14.8% improvement over 2019 when 1,844 birds were harvested. It was the best season since 2011 when 2,580 birds were harvested. LDWF Wild Turkey/Small Game Program Manager Cody Cedotal said the 2020 season was like no other in Louisiana and many other states.

“With the entire state under a stay-at-home order during the time frame, reports indicated increased hunting pressure in some areas, but decreased pressure in others,’’ Cedotal said. “Reports and season assessments from hunters range from poor to very good.’’

Cedotal said it’s too early to tell yet if the increased harvest is a by-product of a season adjustment in Louisiana in 2018 or part of increased hunter effort across the state. The Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission (LWFC), on recommendation by LDWF, pushed back the beginning of turkey season in 2018 to allow for increased breeding opportunity, aimed at sustaining and increasing wild turkey populations statewide.

Results from the 2019/2020 Louisiana Big and Small Game Harvest Survey are expected in the next month and will allow for a comparison of the harvest index generated from that survey and an assessment of hunter effort for the 2020 season. This assessment will potentially shed more light on the reasons for an increased reported harvest.

In addition to increased harvests, reports from hunters indicated increased encounters with jakes (sub-adult males). Similar reports were noted in 2019.

“This is an indication of potentially good things to come for 2021,’’ Cedotal said. “However, the intense rain events we are experiencing in some parts of the state thus far in May are of immediate concern. These rain events could have a negative impact on reproduction for this year, causing increased mortality of young wild turkey poults.’’

Notice of Death May 21, 2020

Please note that the State Law limits number of people during the visitation period and attendance at the service to ten (10) or less and that social distancing be observed! This must be strictly enforced! Thank you in advance for your cooperation. It is designed for the safety of the family, our staff and the general public.

WINN:
June Cockerham Sanders
June 21, 1941 – May 18, 2020
Visitation: Friday, May 22, 2020 from 12:00 PM until 1:30 PM at at Southern Funeral Home in Winnfield, LA
Service: Friday, May 22 at 2 pm at Sanders Chapel Cemetery near Calvin, LA

Sue Moore
March 28, 1957 – May 19, 2020
Arrangements TBA

Johnnie Jeraline Canerday Shelton
June 10, 1933 – May 19, 2020
Graveside Service: Friday, May 22 at 10 am at Bethlehem Cemetery in Calvin, LA

Clyde F. Swanson, Jr.
January 25, 1939 – April 26, 2020
Graveside Service: Sunday, May 24 at 2 pm in the Garden of Memories in Winnfield, LA

NATCHITOCHES:
Walter Stewart Meziere, Sr.
August 8, 1940 – May 13, 2020
Visitation: 10 am until 11:30 am on the 23rd at St. Augustine Catholic Church with recitation of the Holy Rosary beginning at 11:30 am.
Service: 12 noon on Saturday, May 23, 2020, at St. Augustine Catholic Church in Isle Brevelle, LA. Mass with honors provided by the Natchitoches City Police Department.

SABINE:
Effie Lee Brunk
January 16, 1929 – May 19, 2020
Arrangements TBA

 

Winn Correctional Center Number of Confirmed COVID-19 Cases Among Detainees Almost Doubles Since Friday

Since the WPJ last published on Monday, the number of detainees at Winn Correctional Center (WCC) that have tested positive for Coronavirus has almost doubled to 62. That puts the number of positive cases at WCC just two less than Richwood Correctional Center (RCC), which has the highest number of positive ICE Detainees in the state. The families of two employees at RCC claim they died after contracting COVID-19 while working at the RCC facility. 

The ICE.gov website also states that there are no U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) employees working at WCC that have tested positive for the virus. It is important to note that most people working at WCC do not work directly for ICE but instead are employed by the Winn Parish Sheriff’s Office (WPSO). Therefore the total number of employees that have tested positive for the virus is unknown as neither ICE nor WPSO has released any statistics for WCC employees.

You can review ICE reported case numbers here: ice.gov/coronavirus

Louisiana Department of Health – Winn Parish Positive COVID-19 Cases

As of May 19, 2020, Winn Parish is reporting 90 confirmed cases of COVID-19. This number includes correction centers and nursing homes. 

The Louisiana Department of Health has updated its website to reflect the latest number of COVID-19 positives and will continue to update its website at noon each day.

There has been an increase in cases in Region 4 (Acadiana) area. The Department is monitoring this increase carefully and this recent increase is due to outbreaks at three worksites that are not open to the public. The Department is working with these sites to prevent further spread of this illness.

Nursing homes
Nursing homes are required to report positive COVID-19 cases to the Department of Health. The Department is working with each individual facility to increase testing of residents with and without symptoms; to minimize infection; and to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

The greatest risk for nursing homes is COVID-19 spreading within facilities and among vulnerable residents. A nursing home with residents who have tested positive for the illness is not a threat to the general public.

The Department is following recent CMS requirements and only certified nursing facilities are required to report the information in this report. This information is as complete and accurate as possible. It will be reported weekly on Mondays. Click here for the full report.

Other adult residential facilities
In addition, the Department is sharing aggregate totals for other adult residential facilities, which are not certified and not required to report on a federal level. This information will be shared on Mondays through a Department news release. Today, the Department is reporting a total of 526 COVID-19 cases among residents of other adult residential facilities and 65 deaths. 86 facilities are reporting at least one COVID-19 case.

Louisiana Department of Health Releases COVID-19 Nursing Home Report

Nursing homes are required to report positive COVID-19 cases to the Department of Health. The Department is working with each individual facility to increase testing of residents with and without symptoms; to minimize infection; and to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

The greatest risk for nursing homes is COVID-19 spreading within facilities and among vulnerable residents. A nursing home with residents who have tested positive for the illness is not a threat to the general public.

The Department is following recent CMS requirements and only certified adult care facilities are required to report the information in this report.

This information is as complete and accurate as possible. It will be reported weekly on Mondays. In addition, the Department is sharing aggregate totals for other adult residential facilities, which are not certified. This information will be shared on Mondays through a Department news release.

Review entire report here:

Land Talk With Kevin – Wildlife Habitat and Pine Plantations (Part 2)

By Kevin Daugherty

This week, we’ll look at the life cycle of a pine plantation and see that timber and wildlife management doesn’t have to be an either-or proposition. Plantations go through several stages and the wildlife habitat is constantly changing.

The first stage is site preparation and planting. All the timber has been removed and it’s time to start over. A herbicide application, often followed by prescribed fire, is normally the first step and is vital for getting the seedlings established. This not only makes the site suitable for planting, it increases the survival and growth rate of the seedlings by holding back the explosion of woody growth and grasses that would compete for sunlight, nutrients, and water. Once the site is prepared, seedlings are planted, usually at a rate of between 620 and 680 trees per acre.

From age one through about eight or ten, ample sunlight is providing the optimum condition for beneficial wildlife foods to grow. Plantations that have intensive site preparation treatments may not start producing much deer forage until the second year. While chemical site preparation reduces the amount of woody browse plants, their absence leaves room for higher quality fobs, vines, and shrubs. These foods will continue to grow and cover will thicken until the pines reach the size where their crowns begin to close and reduce the amount of sunlight reaching the forest floor. This stage of the pine plantation provides quality habitat for a wide variety of wildlife.

The next stage occurs around year ten, when the crowns close and tree growth slows dramatically. The herbaceous growth that has thrived and provided wildlife with food and cover starts to diminish until basically all that’s left on the forest floor is pine straw. In terms of both timber production and wildlife habitat, this is the least productive stage. It may last from two to five years, depending on how long it takes the pines to reach merchantable size. The problem is that there aren’t many options for improvement. A prescribed burn can be conducted but, at this stage, the risk is almost greater than the reward. Though a low-intensity fire would help the pines, it would do little to improve wildlife habitat at this point. Therefore, all we can do is wait until the trees are large enough to thin.
Usually by age 12 – 15, the plantation is ready to be thinned for the first time. I have seen a few exceptional stands reach merchantable size as young as 10, but they are the exception. Most first-thinnings are done by cutting every fourth or fifth row and then thinning in-between. The crown spacing I recommend depends on the landowner’s objective. If timber production carries more or equal weight to wildlife, I’ll recommend a nice even crown spacing where there’s a little daylight between each tree crown. If deer habitat is the primary objective, I’ll recommend opening the canopy up a little more. After the timber is thinned, we’ve now entered the most productive stage as far as wildlife utilization goes. Management options for the understory are wide open. Prescribed burning, for example, is extremely beneficial during this stage. It can be used to set back plant succession and improve wildlife food. I let the understory growth dictate when to burn but it’s usually done every three to five years. Other practices can be used, such as an aerial fertilizer application, which can improve the growth of the timber as well as the production of beneficial native vegetation in the understory. Strip disking the cut rows from the timber harvest can stimulate a diverse plant population to feed wildlife. Herbicide can be used in a variety of ways to remove unwanted hardwood species such as sweetgum and Chinese tallow.

As the pines grow, in response to the thinning, their crowns will start to close once again. Depending on the quality of the plantation and logging access, I normally recommend thinning a second time as soon as the crowns touch. After thinning two or three times, the stand will be ready for a final harvest and the process is started over again.

From the time a plantation is thinned the first time, you can manage the overstory and understory almost as separate components. The overstory is where the money is and the understory is where the deer and turkeys are. It doesn’t get much better than that. The timber is regularly thinned to keep it growing and increasing in value. The understory is regularly manipulated to set back plant succession and maintain productive wildlife habitat. Over the entire life of a pine forest, only a few years should actually be in the dense, dark, unproductive stage most people associate with a pine plantation.

If you take a proactive management approach, pine plantations can offer deer and other wildlife a tremendous amount of forage
and quality habitat. To do it right however, there’s more to it than just cutting timber.

Kevin Daugherty is a forestry and wildlife consultant, real estate agent, and the managing member of ForestLand Associates, LLC. He’s a member of the Association of Consulting Foresters, Louisiana Forestry Association, Society of American Foresters, and is a Land Certification Inspector for the Quality Deer Management Association. He and his wife live in rural Winn Parish. For questions about this article Kevin can be reached at (318) 312-1240 or kevin@forestland.com 

Auto-Tort Reform Passes Louisiana Senate 29-8

Monday, the Louisiana Senate passed SB 418 by Senator Kirk Talbot on a vote of 29-8.

Sen. Kirk Talbot (R-River Ridge), SB 418 will bring Louisiana’s legal system in line with other states in exchange for a mandatory auto insurance rate reduction. The bill will:

Lower Louisiana’s jury trial threshold from $50,000 to $5,000.
Louisiana has the highest jury trial threshold in the nation at $50,000. That means unless your case is valued at $50,000 or higher, a judge rather than a jury, will decide your case. The end result is a trend of cases with higher value, but low enough to avoid a jury in the hopes of landing the right judge. Maryland has the next highest threshold at $15,000 and 32 states have no jury trial threshold.

End the collateral source rule.
The current judicially made law prohibits evidence of what was actually paid by a plaintiff in medical bills and allows only evidence of full-price or “sticker price” medical bills to be submitted into evidence, without regard to contractual adjustments for health insurance or limits on reimbursement established by public payors. This allows plaintiffs and their attorneys to recover a windfall that far exceeds both their actual liability for medical care and the costs of health insurance premiums they have paid.


Remove the direct action statute.
Louisiana is one of only three states where a plaintiff can sue you and your insurance company. Most states recognize that bringing an insurance company into a lawsuit encourages a jury’s tendency to award larger damages. It’s human nature to see a company in a different light than a real person, but in the end it’s a real person paying a very real bill.
Extend the prescriptions for tort actions from 1 year to 2 years for motor vehicle accidents only.
A compromise providing the other elements of the bill remain in place.

Eliminate the seat belt gag order.
Seat belt usage is currently hidden from juries according to state law, even though unbelted occupants typically have medical costs three times higher than those wearing seat belts – as required by law.

Require a mandatory 10% rate reduction for personal auto insurance.
The bill also establishes a mandatory review of commercial auto insurance to lower rates when actuarially justified. This bill will help rebuild competition in our markets, providing real relief for Louisiana ratepayers.


You can track the Bill in the Senate here https://legis.la.gov/legis/BillInfo.aspx?s=20RS&b=SB418&sbi=y

You can read SB418 here:

Remember This? The Disappearance of Mary Miller

By Brad Dison

At around 10 o’clock on a cold Friday night, December 3, 1926, 36-year-old Mary Miller drove away from her home in Sunningdale, England, following an argument with her husband, Archie. All day Saturday, family and friends tried to locate Mary but were unsuccessful. On Sunday, a young boy found a car hanging vicariously over the edge of a cliff above a deep chalk pit near Guilford. Police arrived and searched the car. Inside they found women’s clothing, a fur coat, a leather case with some papers inside, and Mary’s driver’s license. Police searched the chalk pit, nearby houses, woods, and ponds nearby, but found no trace of Mary.

Investigators returned to Mary’s home and spoke with her husband. Archie said that Mary had suffered from “nervous prostration.” “She was a very nervous case.” He told detectives that he left before Mary, and that it was unlike Mary to go for a drive at that time of night alone. “The only explanation I can give,” Archie said, “is that she is suffering from loss of memory. My wife had a serious nervous breakdown last spring and had recuperated in France.” Archie explained that Mary’s “nervous breakdown,” was due to the death of her mother.

Many people resigned to the fact that Mary had committed suicide. Only days before, Mary had remarked to a family member that “unless I can get away from Sunningdale, it will be the end.” Before leaving home on Friday night, Mary wrote a letter to her husband which police said “amounts to a tragic farewell message, indicating that the end has been reached and she was resolved to sacrifice everything and commit some drastic act.” Mary left her husband’s letter unsealed along with a sealed letter which was only to be opened in the event that her body was found.

Family and friends told investigators that Archie’s and Mary’s home life appeared to be happy. Together, they had on child, a young daughter named Rosalind. However, the couple’s marriage was far from happy. Four months earlier, Archie told Mary that he wanted a divorce because he had fallen in love with another woman, Nancy Neele. On the day of Mary’s disappearance, Archie told Mary that he planned to spend the weekend with his mistress.

By the third day of the search, the number of people searching for Mary grew from just a few policemen to include hundreds of volunteers. Some of the searchers used bloodhounds but none of the dogs picked up the slightest scent. Policemen and volunteers widened the search. Pilots in two “aeroplanes” joined the search and flew low over the area. Searchers dragged every pond and searched all of the woods for miles around. Unable to search through thickets, one farmer used his tractor to cut paths into dense woodlands. A potential witness came forward and told investigators that she had heard screams near her home a short distance away from the search area. Volunteers and policemen searched that area and dragged the nearby stream. All of their searches proved fruitless.

Several searchers focused their efforts on a pond near where the young boy found Mary’s car, a pond locally referred to as “Silent Pool.” Near the abandoned car, searchers found a tin can with a note inside which read; “Ask Candle Lanche. She knows more about the Silent Pool…” Investigators were unable to determine who Candle Lanche was or even if the note was directly related to Mary’s disappearance. Local legends persisted that the pond was bottomless. For several days and nights searchers dropped grappling hooks from long ropes into the murky waters of “Silent Pool,” but found nothing. By this point, searchers held out little hope that Mary was still alive and expected to recover her body at any point.

Scotland Yard detectives received “only the vaguest clews” about Mary’s actions after leaving her house following the argument with Archie. A gravel pit worker told police that at about 6:20 on the morning after Mary drove away from her home, he helped Mary start her car near where the young boy found it abandoned. The farmer said Mary’s “head was bare and her hair was covered with frost. Her teeth chattered with the cold and her manner was distressed.” Once the car started, Mary drove away. The young boy found Mary’s car two hours later. Two men saw Mary’s photograph in area newspapers and told police that they saw a woman resembling Mary around noon three days after she went missing. The woman had “a vacant look in her eyes,” and was walking rapidly toward London. Police found no other potential witnesses.

Just when almost everyone had accepted that they would never find Mary alive there was a glimmer of hope. Archie’s brother, a resident of London, received a letter from Mary which was dated after her disappearance. In the letter, Mary wrote that she had been ill and was going to a spa in Yorkshire for treatment. Based on this letter, police suspended the search for Mary’s body. However, they still needed to find Mary to ensure that she was alive and well.

On December 14, 1926, a maidservant at a health spa in Harrogate, some 230 miles north of where Mary’s abandoned car was found, contacted police. She reported that photographs of Mary in the newspapers looked similar to a guest in the spa who registered as Mrs. Teresa Neele, of Capetown, South Africa. Neele, detectives noted, was the surname of Archie’s mistress. The guest arrived on the evening of December 4, the day Mary’s abandoned car was discovered. The guest was popular at the hotel. She sang, danced, played billiards, and went into town every day. The guest seemed perfectly normal. The only reason the maidservant contacted police was that the guest so closely resembled photographs of the missing woman.

Archie drove to the health spa to determine whether or not the guest was Mary. Archie recognized Mary immediately, but Mary did not recognize Archie as her husband. At first, Mary thought Archie was just an acquaintance “whose identity she did not quite fix.” After they spoke for a while, she recognized a closeness with Archie but thought he was her brother. Archie explained that he was her husband and that they had a daughter. Mary had no memory of either. After their discussion, Archie told reporters, “There is no question of her identity; she is my wife. She is suffering from complete loss of memory. She does not know who she is. We are hoping to take her to London to-morrow to see doctors and specialists, and we are hoping that with rest and quiet she will be fully restored.”

Within a few months, Mary’s memory recovered, mostly. Although she lived another fifty years, she was never able to explain her disappearance. She always claimed to have no memory of the event. She and Archie divorced. A week after their divorce was finalized, Archie married Nancy Neele. Mary continued her career as a writer and, four years after her disappearance, married an archaeologist.

In her career, which spanned several decades, Mary wrote sixty-six detective novels, many of which revolved around fictional detectives Miss Marple and Hercule Poirot. She also authored fourteen short story collections, six romance novels, several plays, one of which is the world’s longest-running play entitled “The Mousetrap.” Mary is the best-selling novelist of all time with sales of over two billion books in many languages. Mary’s full name was Agatha Mary Clarissa Miller. Her first husband’s name was Archie Christie. You know her as Agatha Christie.

Sources:
The Province (Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada), December 6, 1926, p.2.
The Shreveport Times, December 7, 1926, p.1.
The Boston Globe, December 8, 1926, p.10.
The Evening Journal (Wilmington, Delaware), December 8, 1926, p.9.
The Plain Speaker (Hazelton, Pennsylvania), December 8, 1926, p.4.
The New York Daily News, December 8, 1926, p.148.
The Shreveport Times, December 8, 1926, p.14.
Arizona Republic, December 9, 1926, p.10.
The Miami Herald, December 10, 1926, p.1.
The Windsor Star, December 9, 1926, p.7.
The Charlotte Observer, December 12, 1926, p.36.
Fort Worth Record-Telegram, December 13, 1926, p.2.
York Daily Record, December 13, 1926, p.7.
The London Guardian, December 15, 1926, p.11.
“The Home of Agatha Christie.” Accessed April 19, 2020. https://www.agathachristie.com/.

Louisiana Legislative Auditor Report Highlights Effect of COVID-19 on Local Government Revenues

The Louisiana Legislative Auditor has estimated the impact on Louisiana local government revenues from sales taxes, ad valorem taxes, severance taxes, and mineral royalties due to social distancing and falling energy prices stemming from COVID-19. This work was performed to enable federal, state, and local officials to anticipate budget adjustments that local governments will need to make and to develop plans to balance local budgets by spending cuts, tax increases, loans, and disaster grants.

It’s estimated that parish governing authorities, municipalities, school boards, and sheriffs will collectively experience revenue losses in sales, ad valorem, and severance taxes and mineral royalties ranging from $404.7 million to $1.1 billion (2.3% to 6.9%) during fiscal years 2020 and 2021, with an average total loss of $787.5 million (4.6%).

These losses would be between 1.0% to 2.8% of total local government revenues from all sources, or 1.4% to 4.0% of general revenues (which excludes grants and charges for services). These estimates are based on assumptions that the number of people employed in Louisiana will decrease by 197,000 to 317,000 (as distinguished from unemployment claims) and will take two to five years to recover, along with other specific assumptions about different sectors of the state’s economy, as explained in Appendix A of the report.

Figure 3 reflects the decrease in sales and ad valorem taxes and minera-related revenues municipalities, parish governing authorities, school boards, and sheriff’s for fiscal year 2021 with average scenario. Winn Parish is estimated to have lost 4.5% revenue.

Appendix B reflects estimated effects social distancing and energy market weakness from COVID-19 on local government sales tax, ad valorem tax, and mineral related revenues by parish (showing dollar amounts in thousands.)

Appendix C reflects estimated effects social distancing and energy market weakness from COVID-19 on local government sales tax, ad valorem tax, and mineral-related revenues, by parish and type of entity (showing dollar amounts in thousands.)

View the entire report here:

Figure 3
Appendix B
Appendix C

Obituary – June Cockerham Sanders


Mrs. June Cockerham Sanders, age 78 of Winnfield, Louisiana passed away on Monday, May 18, 2020.

Mrs. Sanders was preceded in death by her parents Kenneth Buster Carpenter and Loreese Carpenter, her husband Clyde Sanders, son Frankie Tolbert, grandsons Cole Sanders and Justin Sanders, and brother Kenneth Carpenter.

Those left to cherish her memory include her sons Michael Sanders (Alicia) of Calvin, David Sanders of Winnfield and Kevin Sanders of Winnfield. She is also survived by grandchildren Nicole, Kirsten, Madison, Krislyn, Karly and great-grandchildren Nevaeh, Nalani, Kailynn, Kyler, Korbyn, Parker, Koe, Bradliee and Kinley. Siblings are Eugene Cockerham, Annette Womack and Peggy Lodridge.

June was born June 21, 1941 in Winnfield, Louisiana. Her sons and grandchildren were her greatest accomplishments in life. Through the years many neighborhood children visited her home and she took them in as her own. Fishing was something that she loved doing; just sitting outside enjoying the Lord’s handiwork. She was very talented having crocheted and sewed many beautiful baby blankets and clothes for her family members. June loved the Lord and was a member of Bethlehem Baptist Church and the Misfits Sunday School Class.

A graveside service will be held at 2:00 on Friday, May 22, 2020 at Sanders Chapel Cemetery near Calvin, Louisiana with Rev. Lamar Carpenter and Rev. Bobby Bates officiating. Burial will be under the direction of Southern Funeral Home.

The family will receive friends at Southern Funeral Home for visitation on Friday, May 22, 2020 from 12:00 PM until 1:30 PM.

Notice of Death May 19, 2020

Please note that the State Law limits number of people during the visitation period and attendance at the service to ten (10) or less and that social distancing be observed! This must be strictly enforced! Thank you in advance for your cooperation. It is designed for the safety of the family, our staff and the general public.

WINN:
June Cockerham Sanders
June 21, 1941 – May 18, 2020
Visitation: Friday, May 22, 2020 from 12:00 PM until 1:30 PM at at Southern Funeral Home in Winnfield, LA
Service: Friday, May 22 at 2 pm at Sanders Chapel Cemetery near Calvin, LA

Dana Elizabeth Redfern
July 29, 1959 – May 17, 2020
Visitation: Wednesday, May 20 from 11 am – 1:30 pm at LifePoint Assembly of God in Jena
Service: Wednesday, May 20 at 2 pm at LifePoint Assembly of God in Jena
Interment: Will follow in Woodland Memorial Park in Jena

NATCHITOCHES:
Nancy E. Williams
May 15, 2020
Arrangements TBA

Walter Stewart Meziere, Sr.
August 8, 1940 – May 13, 2020
Visitation: 10 am until 11:30 am on the 23rd at St. Augustine Catholic Church with recitation of the Holy Rosary beginning at 11:30 am.
Service: 12 noon on Saturday, May 23, 2020, at St. Augustine Catholic Church in Isle Brevelle, LA. Mass with honors provided by the Natchitoches City Police Department.

William “Bill” Archie Mooty
August 9, 1936 – May 18. 2020
Service: Thursday, May 21, 2020, at 1:00 pm at Blanchard-St. Denis Funeral Home; with visitation prior to the service starting at 11:00 am.

 

Winn Correctional Center Positive COVID Cases Continues to Increases

As of May 15, 2020, at 5:05 PM, the Winn Correctional Center (WCC) in Winnfield, LA, has 37 detainees that have tested positive for COVID-19, according to ice.gov. The website also states that there are no U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) employees working at WCC that have tested positive for the virus. It is important to note that most people working at WCC do not work directly for ICE but instead are employed by the Winn Parish Sheriff’s Office (WPSO). Therefore the total number of employees that have tested positive for the virus is unknown as neither ICE nor WPSO has released any statistics for guards. 

You can review ICE reported case numbers here: https://www.ice.gov/coronavirus