Winnfield FFA Travels to 93rd Louisiana State FFA Convention in Alexandria

The Winnfield FFA traveled to the 93rd Louisiana State FFA Convention held in Alexandria, LA, on June 6-9. The State Convention is held the first complete week of June each year. It is held to recognize the achievements of the past year, conduct statewide business (including the election of the area and state officers), and host various state competitions.

The weekend before the convention starts is when some of the business begins. FFA members from across the state ran for officer positions by going through a nominating committee process that spanned two and a half days. The committee, consisting of FFA members, business leaders, and educators, interviewed the candidates and had them put on workshops, give speeches, and participate in other activities to see who best represented the qualities they were looking for. On Monday, after the convention officially started, the committee’s report nominated Winnfield FFA’s Annie Heard and Lauren Poole for State Vice President and State Sentinel, respectively. The candidate’s nominations were unopposed, so by the end of the week, they would be installed as members of the 2022-2023 Louisiana FFA State Officer team. This is the second consecutive year two Winnfield FFA members have served on the Louisiana State FFA Officer team. This marks only the ninth time in Louisiana FFA history for this to happen. Out of those nine times, four were from chapters in Winn Parish, the last one being from Calvin in 1992-1993 and 1993-1994. The only time for a chapter to do so three years in a row was Winnfield FFA in 1971-1972, 1972-1973, and 1973-1974.

Outside of State Officer elections, Winnfield FFA had a busy schedule. Over the span of 4 days, there were five general sessions and two business sessions, with many meetings in between. Throughout the deliberations, activities, and competitions, Winnfield FFA received much recognition.
The group competed in the Food Science Career Development Event and received third place in the state! The food science and technology career development event is designed to promote learning activities in food science and technology related to the food industry and to assist students in developing practical knowledge of principles used in a team decision-making process. Team members included Gracelyn Chevallier, Parker Sonnier, Alyssa VanBlaricum, and Chloe Whisonant. Gracelyn was the third high-point individual overall, and Alyssa was the fourth overall.

Winnfield had two state champions in proficiency awards. Proficiency Awards award FFA members who, through their supervised agricultural experiences (SAEs), have developed specialized skills that they can apply to their future careers. Students can compete for awards in almost 50 areas covering everything from agricultural communications to wildlife management. This year, Madison Green won state in Goat Production. Madison’s supervised agricultural experience focuses on caring for and maintaining around 35 Boer, Pygmy, and Nigerian Dwarf goats, as well as the farm’s facilities. Lauren Poole won state in Environmental Science and Natural Resource Management. Lauren’s supervised agricultural experience consisted of a paid placement position as a Youth Conservation Corps worker at the United States Forest Service (USFS) Winn Ranger District in Winnfield, Louisiana. These projects will be sent to National FFA and judged this summer against other projects across the country. They will find out the results by the end of August.

The chapter was recognized as being a Superior Chapter through the National Chapter Award program. A central component of a successful FFA chapter is having a strong Program of Activities, or POA. The POA is designed to address three major pillars: Growing Leaders, Building Communities, and Strengthening Agriculture. Chapters that develop and implement an outstanding POA are eligible for recognition in the National Chapter Award Program. To qualify for a state or national award, your chapter must complete at least 15 activities: one for each of the five quality standards in each of the three divisions. This recognition signifies the chapter completed all 15 of the activities required. Only ten percent of chapters in the state received this award.

Throughout the week, Winnfield FFA had three members go through the nominating committee process to be elected to Area II officer positions. Area II consists of the following parishes: Desoto, Natchitoches, Sabine, Grant, LaSalle, Winn, Beauregard, Rapides, and Vernon. The area nominating committee process is similar to the state process but with four rounds instead of six. In a business session on Thursday, Parker Sonnier and Joy So were nominated for the positions of Vice President and Treasurer, respectively. They will serve the year by visiting other chapters in the area and serving as leadership delegates for next year’s state convention.

Other than the awards, the week also served as a tribute to the previous year. Winnfield had Peyton Little retiring as the state president and Parker Carlino retiring as the state sentinel. The chapter was also recognized as being the Area II Sweepstakes winner, which goes to the chapter that has had the best showing in career and leadership development events throughout the year.

The FFA is a national organization containing over 800,000 members practicing leadership and preparing for careers in the science, business, and technology of agriculture. In the Winnfield FFA Chapter alone, we have 165 members. The FFA is an integral part of the agricultural education program in public schools. The FFA mission is to make a positive difference in the lives of students by developing their potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education.

Peyton Arthur and Ryan Riley are the Winnfield Senior High School FFA advisors.


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Back to Back Book Clubs; The Social Coffee House Edition

By: Kaycie Kile
WPJ Reporter

The Social Coffee House hasn’t just been filling our cups full this summer; it’s got creativity on tap and has brought forth its next promising public venture—a book club. Last Thursday, June 23rd, the doors locked, and the first official deliberation began. Melody Bonnette, a fellow bookworm and known co-owner and operator of The Social Coffee House (est. 2021), is delighted at the prospect of providing a safe space to unwind and break down future monthly reads!

“Sea of Tranquillity,” by Emily St. John Mandel, a stand-alone science fiction thriller and the first pick of The Social’s book club, is a thought-provoking trek with an unexpected ending. Though not considered the usual page-turner by attending members, it immediately broke the ice, giving way to a deep sharing of perspectives on more taciturn subjects like morality, living in a pandemic, and even the advancement of society and our dependency on technology. How St. John Mandel illustrates and maintains such strong parallels through space and time, and under three hundred pages no less, is impressive and will leave you contemplating well into your evening.

The Social’s club is still laying down a few fundamental bricks and encourages open table discussion for anyone interested in being a part of its developing stages. With ideas already in the works, such as recommendation rotation, themed eats and treats, and maybe even a free library system in the future, the group has gotten off to an imaginative start with the promise of more as it continues to grow. So be sure to mark your calendars for Thursday, July 7th, when the club is set to graze and gab over the next recommended pick, “Can’t Look Away” by Carola Lovering, a suspenseful contemporary romance set in the 21st century, and would be thrilled to have you!

According to the U.S. Department of Education, fifty-four percent of U.S. adults between eighteen and seventy-four years old (that’s 130 million people, give or take) lack proficiency in literacy and comprehension, reading at or below the average sixth-grader. A book club or two probably won’t deal a measurable blow to that total. However, here in Winnfield, it’s an opportunity for a different experience but with the same goals in mind; providing a secure environment where literacy, companionship, and healthy adult interactions can take place outside the home. So whether it’s Overbooked or The Social Coffee House, get out and join one or both of these phenomenal groups providing you with accessibility to a key social and educational tradition. You can expect to be met with the kindest and most memorable folk who will do their best to help expand your tastes, bookshelves, and circles this summer.


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CMA Student Appreciates Winn Parish Medical Center’s Help with Clinical Requirements

My name is Mandi Taylor and I am a student at Keiser University’s online program for Certified Medical Assisting, along with another resident of Winnfield, Angela Walker. When it became time to find our clinical site, panic set in as neither one of us knew where to begin. Angela emailed Dr. James Lee and he responded right back with “Sure I would love to.” Being as he is affiliated with the local hospital, Winn Parish Medical Center, there was a process we had to follow. I emailed Ashley, head of HR, with the contract, what skills we had to learn based on the curriculum of the school and our start date. Again, she responded quickly with a “we would love to, let me send this to our CEO Monica,” and within two days we had a site. The first two months were our clinical hours (10 hours a week for 8 weeks) and we got to observe and work along with the nurses and doctors in the surgery department, the emergency department, the laboratory, and Winn Wellness Clinic.

Personally, I enjoyed every department I was in. Dr. Lee and his nurses in surgery were amazing and took the time to explain to me every step they were doing and why. If I had questions, they answered them to where I understood. They never seemed annoyed because believe me, I’m all about questions. The nurse anesthesiologist Jeff is so funny and had no problem explaining every step, every machine, and beep as he was administering medicine. Kim, KeKe, Lana, and Gladys who are all part of the surgery department were so welcoming, helpful, and a joy to be around.

For my externship hours, which were 40 hours a week for 4 weeks, I choose to do all of them at Winn Wellness Clinic. I got to work alongside all the nurses, the receptionist, and all four providers (Tony, Angela, Dana, and Dr. Shelton). Michelle, Marie, Star, Ms. Judy, Ms. Sheila, Nikki, Cassie, and Jennifer are like a family. To watch everyone, work together, work as a team, help each other with questions, and have each other’s back was truly amazing. As a patient, you really don’t know what goes on in the back part of a doctor’s office. As a student and seeing it firsthand, I felt privileged to learn so from them. Not just one of them, but all of them. You can only learn so much from a book or computer stimulation, but what I learned hands-on, to me, was much more significant.

Tony Acosta, PA-C was amazing. He had no shame to ask me a question and expect me to know the answer or find it quick. If I was wrong, he let me know but then provided me with the right information and ask me about it later to see if I remembered. He would allow me to observe while he was with patients, and explain his diagnosis and treatment plan.

Once I graduate and get state board certified I will look high and low to find a “work family” just like Winn Wellness. This group has made me have high expectations of the type of environment I want to work in. Come Friday, my last day, I know I will leave in tears. It will be a bittersweet moment, but I feel so much more prepared for my career because of all of them.

We also attended the Rural Trauma Team Development Course that was sponsored by WPMC and Rapides Regional Trauma Center. Listening to Dr. Jeremy Timmer explain how important it is to get to a trauma center within 60 minutes of when the trauma occurred was full of information. Learning how to apply a tourniquet to stop bleeding or intubate a patient when needed is something most CMA’s don’t get to experience, but because of the invitation from WPMC, Angela and I are lucky ones.

From day one to my final week here at Winn Parish Medical Center/Winn Wellness, I have been treated with respect and never did I feel like I was not wanted, or I was a “burden” for being here.

Thank You to everyone at WPMC and Winn Wellness! Never forget the difference each of you has made not only in my future career but in my heart as well!

Pictured above from left: Marie Delaughter, Nikki Lawson, Nikki Cotton and Starr Womack. Back Row from left: Ms. Sheila Belle Temple, Michelle Culver (Clinic Manager), Jennifer Lowe, Mandi Taylor, and Ms. Judy Thomas


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Winn Parish Sheriff’s Office Arrest Report

Date: 6-21-22
Name: Turhan Cook
Address: Winnfield, LA
Race: Black
Sex: Male
Age: 66
Charge: Failure to register as a sex offender

Date: 6–21-22
Name: Frances J Smith
Address: Winnfield, LA
Race: White
Sex: Female
Age: 64
Charge: Harboring a sex offender

Date: 6-22-22
Name: David Cardett Hollingsworth
Address: Winnfield, LA
Race: Black
Sex: Male
Age: 31
Charge: Failure to appear (x3)

Date: 6-22-22
Name: David Cardett Hollingsworth
Address: Winnfield, LA
Race: Black
Sex: Male
Age: 31
Charge: Obstructing public passage, Possession

Date: 6-22-22
Name: Cody Dunlap
Address: Winnfield, LA
Race: White
Sex: Male
Age: 22
Charge: Failure to appear

Date: 6-22-22
Name: Stephanie Mercer
Address: Tullos, LA
Race: White
Sex: Female
Age: 32
Charge: Child desertion (x3)

Date: 6-23-22
Name: Mason Booker
Address: Winnfield, LA
Race: Black
Sex: Male
Age: 30
Charge: Resisting arrest by flight

Date: 6-23-22
Name: Lamarcus Dean Thirs
Address: Alexandria, LA
Race: Black
Sex: Male
Age: 33
Charge: DWI (1st)

Date: 6-24-22
Name: Kimberly D Graham
Address: Alexandria, LA
Race: White
Sex: Female
Age: 24
Charge: Introduction of contraband within Winn parish jail

Date: 6-24-22
Name: Christy Ingles
Address: Winnfield, LA
Race: White
Sex: Female
Age: 44
Charge: Conspiracy to commit, Introduction of contraband

Date: 6-24-22
Name: Nichols Jordan
Address: Winnfield, LA
Race: White
Sex: Male
Age: 22
Charge: Conspiracy to commit, Introduction of contraband

Date: 6-24-22
Name: Micheal Rison
Address: Winnfield, LA
Race: White
Sex: Male
Age: 27
Charge: Conspiracy to commit, Introduction of contraband

Date: 6-24-22
Name: Brandice Farmer
Address: Winnfield, LA
Race: Black
Sex: Female
Age: 28
Charge: Stalking

Date: 6-24-22
Name: Charlotte Renee Hensley
Address: Saline, LA
Race: White
Sex: Female
Age: 42
Charge: Improper lane use, Driving under a suspension,

Date: 6-25-22
Name: Dewona Marshall Raybon
Address: Winnfield, LA
Race: Black
Sex: Female
Age: 51
Charge: Driving under suspension, Operating a vehicle while intoxicated, Speeding

Date: 6-26-22
Name: Gary D Wise
Address: Winnfield, LA
Race: White
Sex: Male
Age: 47
Charge: Failure to appear

Date: 6-27-22
Name: Johnny Worsham
Address: Winnfield, LA
Race: White
Sex: Male
Age: 57
Charge: Failure to appear

Date: 6-27-22
Name: Jacob L Procell
Address: Winnfield, LA
Race: White
Sex: Male
Age: 33
Charge: Illegal carrying of a weapon, possession of schedule 2, Headlamps required

Date: 6-28-22
Name: Amari Mack
Address: Joyce, LA
Race: Black
Sex: Male
Age: 23
Charge: Battery of an officer, Resisting an officer

This information has been provided by a law enforcement agency as public information. Persons named or shown in photographs or video as suspects in a criminal investigation, or arrested and charged with a crime, have not been convicted of any criminal offense and are presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.


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Remember This? A Silent Moment for Cal

By Brad Dison:

In late July, 1923, Vice President of the United States Calvin Coolidge was greatly relieved by news that President Warren Harding was recovering splendidly from his bout of pneumonia at the Palace Hotel in San Francisco. Calvin was spending time at his summer home, his boyhood home, in Springfield, Vermont. While taking a break from the politics of Washington, D.C., he performed amateur tree surgery on the beautiful old shade tree in his front yard. He paid no attention to reporters and looky-loos as he concentrated on his work.

On the afternoon of August 2, President Harding’s physicians sent Calvin a telegram and reassured him of the president’s health. The Coolidge home had neither electricity nor a telephone. At about 10:30 p.m. that night, Calvin went to bed. Shortly after midnight on August 3, another messenger arrived by car at the Coolidge residence. Calvin was in bed asleep when his father, John C. Coolidge, awoke him. Calvin knew something was wrong by the sound of numerous cars pulling up at the normally tranquil home. John read the telegram to Calvin: “The president died instantly while conversing with members of his family at 7:30 p.m. The physicians report death was apparently due to some brain embolism, probably apoplexy.” He immediately returned a telegram to Mrs. Harding: “We offer you our deepest sympathy. May God bless you and keep you.” He, Calvin, was now President of the United States.

The news was a great blow to Calvin, though he took it with his characteristic calmness. He dressed immediately and descended the stairs to the sitting room where an army of reporters had already gathered. They could detect no difference in Calvin’s demeanor, as was his nature. He calmly told the reporters, “Reports have reached me, which I fear are correct, that President Harding is gone. The world has lost a great and good man. I mourn his loss. He was my chief and my friend.”

Within half an hour, the Coolidge residence, which was normally a quiet and lonely farmhouse became “a mecca for hundreds.” By 1:30 a.m., a telephone was installed at the Coolidge residence. Calvin called Washington and received instructions on how to perform the oath of office. He learned that he needed a notary public to administer the oath of office. Just then, a congressman arrived with two federal employees to act as bodyguards. Calvin’s father, John, a notary public, held a brief swearing in ceremony in his own home. Calvin’s father beamed as he spoke in a trembling voice, “preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States.” A reporter asked Calvin’s father to describe his feelings while swearing in his son to which he replied, “One would not say that he was elated to have the President die.”

Calvin’s first act as president after the swearing in was… to return to bed. The two federal employees turned bodyguards stood on either side of the door to Calvin’s bedroom to ensure that no one disturbed the president and first lady. Cars came and went as Calvin slept. Reporters waited quietly but impatiently outside the Coolidge home. Finally, at 7:20 a.m., Calvin looked out the front door. Reporters bombarded him with questions, but Calvin spoke not a word. Calvin bowed at them indifferently, posed for a few photographs, and went back inside. Ten minutes later, Calvin and several others were “taken by motor car” to a special train which delivered him to the White House.

Becoming president upon the death of a previous president had its challenges. Everyone, especially Calvin, understood that he had not been selected by the people to become president. That changed when he won the 1924 election. Calvin strongly supported women’s suffrage and equality. The economy during his presidency, one of rapid and expansive growth, became known as the “Roaring Twenties.” Calvin preferred to take a hands-off government approach and lived up to his nickname “Silent Cal Coolidge” as he seemingly only spoke out of necessity.

In 1927, Calvin took everyone by surprise when he told reporters in as few words as possible, “I do not choose to run for president in 1928.” Reporters gasped. Calvin briefly explained, “”If I take another term, I will be in the White House till 1933. Ten years in Washington is longer than any other man has had it – too long.”

Following his presidency, Calvin published an autobiography and wrote a syndicated newspaper column entitled, “Calvin Coolidge Says.” The columns most certainly were brief. Just after noon on January 5, 1933, Calvin’s wife returned from shopping and found the former president unconscious on his dressing room floor. A sudden heart attack struck as he was preparing to shave and he fell to the floor. Although several people were present in the home at the time of his death, no one heard Calvin fall. Even at the moment of his death, he remained silent.

On this fourth of July, as you enjoy hot dogs and burgers from the grill and drink cool refreshments, take just a moment of silence for “Silent Cal.” Say Happy Birthday to America… and to Calvin Coolidge. He is the only American president who was born on the fourth of July.

Sources:
1. Vermont Standard (Woodstock, Vermont), August 2, 1923, p.1.
2. The Barre Daily Times (Barre, Vermont), August 2, 1923, p.7.
3. Rutland Daily Herald (Rutland, Vermont), August 3, 1923, p.1.
4. Burlington Daily News (Burlington, Vermont), August 3, 1923, p.1.
5. Rutland Daily Herald (Rutland, Vermont), Ja


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Winning With Room to Spare

Inspired this spring by the Byrd High School girls bowling team knocking off the state’s No. 1 seed in the playoffs and finishing as the surprising, out-of-nowhere state runner-up, I accepted the challenge to captain a team last week in the 2022 “Surfs Up” Bowling Bash at the Four Seasons Bowling Center in Alexandria.

The event was one of many that made up the always-good-times Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame Induction Week, which began Thursday with a press conference to meet the Class of 2022 and ended with the induction of that class Saturday at the Natchitoches Events Center.

In between was tomfoolery, something I know a little something about.

The Big Weekend rolls around every year at this time, and all are welcome, including at the bowling event. Grab five folks, a few bucks, and you’re in. Go to LASportsHall.com and see pictures and videos of all the events and start thinking about next year. I talked with a couple of dozen first-timers who say they’ll be back.

And why? Because a good time was had by all. Especially by me. And especially bowling, because we won.

Not only won but shattered the events record with a score of 925 for our five-man team in 10 frames of team bowling. (They tell me that’s good. What I know about bowling, you could fit inside a bowling ball’s finger hole.)

As a nod to the 50th anniversary of Title IX — and an equal nod (OK, a bigger nod) to them being really good — I recruited members of Louisiana Tech’s girls bowling team. They accepted. Even without under-the-table cash or an NIL deal.

Just solid old-school recruiting. It all comes back to that when you’re trying to build a one-game, winner-take-all team. Surround yourself with quality kegglers.

It is a plus that, besides finishing their most recent season with 33 wins over top-25 teams, 20 wins over Top-10 teams, 12 wins over Top-5 teams, three wins over No. 2 and two wins over the country’s top-ranked team at the time, these young female student-athletes are a joy to be around.

And even more, fun since they earned a bid to the NCAA Tournament and finished as an Elite 8 team.

Friday in Alexandria, they finished as an Elite 1.

Our “five-man team” team is a figure of speech. There was me, bowling-lover-gone-bowling-madman/wizard Coach Matt Nantais, and three willing talents from the team, listed here with some of their 2021-22 accomplishments:

Averi Brown, a grad student from Columbus, Ohio who qualified for the singles national championships; Patricia Rosales, who made a pair of All-Tournament teams; and,

Danielle Jedlicki, who bowled two perfect games, was named to a pair of All-Tournament teams and earned a Tournament MVP.

They had rosin bags. Little pieces of tape on their fingers. A hand fan. Braces for their wrists. Everything but eye black. In it to win it, they were.

Teddy wept.

Did you even know Tech had a bowling team? Now you do. And the state does. And next year, hopefully, more of the nation will know. The national championships will be in Vegas next year. Maybe I’ll “need” to go cover it.

So think about going to some or all of the Hall of Fame events next year. And think about going bowling. Start now if you want a chance to beat us.

Which you will, because I think we’ve been, for future events, disqualified.

But it sure was fun while it lasted.

Contact Teddy at teddy@latech.edu


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After Roe Reversal, Abortion Issue Returns to the People

In a landmark 6-3 decision this past week, the U.S. Supreme Court in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization reversed and overturned the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision which purported to “find” a constitutional right to abortion in the 14th Amendment.

How should we view this Supreme Court decision?

Well, putting aside the moral implications of abortion—which are profound—and looking at Roe strictly as a matter of constitutional law, it was always on shaky legal ground.

Why?

Because our Constitution mandates that our federal government be one of specific, enumerated powers and abortion is not one of them; And because, while the Liberty Clause of the 14th Amendment may allow a right to privacy within a zone of privacy, that zone cannot credibly be construed to include the “right” to terminate the life of a genetically distinct unborn baby.

The harsh national response we are seeing from critics of the reversal of Roe includes the assertion that the Court is exercising power it doesn’t have. This is, respectfully, exactly backwards. As Justice Byron White wrote in dissent (Justice William Rehnquist was the other dissenter) in the 1973 Roe opinion, the Roe decision was an “exercise of raw judicial power”.

Why would Justice White have written that in his 1973 dissent from Roe?

Because the 1973 Roe Court claimed to “find” a constitutional right to abortion that is simply not in the Constitution. Let me say again that abortion can be found nowhere in the Constitution. Further, abortion had never been a part of American common law either.

As such, the 1973 Roe decision had “federalized” the issue of abortion and taken it away from all 50 states. The reversal of Roe last week was simply the correction of a grievous 49-year mistake that the Roe Court—with great judicial arrogance—had made. By taking the issue and preferences away from the states and the people and replacing it with the Roe Court’s own preferences on abortion, it had acted in a manner that was inappropriate, illegal, and unconstitutional. The role of the U.S. Supreme Court is to interpret the law not to make it!

Rather, the Framers of our Constitution left profound moral and policy determinations like the abortion issue to the states and to the people because they wanted these weightiest of decisions to be made as locally as possible.

Someone made this comment to me since the Roe reversal. “So, what you are telling me is my rights are determined by geography; by where I live?” In simplest terms, the answer is “yes.”

Our constitutional scheme essentially sets up the 5o states as “incubators” of the policy ideas and choices of the people in that state. That is why states like Louisiana and Mississippi can chose to have no abortions while states like New York and California (which may even pay for the procedure) have such liberal abortion laws that the child may be aborted up until the moment of birth—and even after, when the unborn child is allowed to die on the table if the abortion was unsuccessful.

To disagree with this outcome is to simply disagree with our constitutional form of government. Our Framers painstakingly hammered out what powers would be directly and expressly granted to the federal government with all the rest remaining with the states and the people.

As the 10th Amendment makes clear the large majority of policy determinations lie with the states. Period. Again, the only powers granted to the federal government are express, specific, and enumerated.

Now, the issue of abortion will return to and be decided by the people and their representatives in each state where, in our constitutional scheme, it belongs.

Royal Alexander is an attorney, writer, and former politician in his native Shreveport, Louisiana. In 2007, he was the Republican candidate for Louisiana Attorney General. In addition to his law practice, Alexander is an opinion writer, a guest lecturer at public events and education forums, and a frequent guest on various TV and radio outlets.

The views and opinions expressed in the My Opinion article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of The Winn Parish Journal. Any content provided by the authors is of their opinion and is not intended to malign any religion, ethnic group, club, organization, company, individual or anyone or anything.


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2022-2023 CLTCC Tuition, Fees to Remain Same as 2021-2022 Charges

Alexandria, La., June 28, 2022 — Recognizing the current economic hardships facing many today, Central Louisiana Technical Community College (CLTCC) will not be increasing tuition or fees for the 2022-2023 school year.

“CLTCC and LCTCS are extremely sensitive to the financial challenges currently impacting everyone in Central Louisiana,” said CLTCC Chancellor Dr. Jimmy Sawtelle. “Families are having to make difficult financial decisions. CLTCC wants to ensure those who want to pursue education and training in a high-wage, high-skill, high-demand career are able to do so without paying higher tuition and fees. By holding our tuition and fees steady we hope to ease the financial burden on our students and their families.”

The cost freeze was recently approved by the Louisiana Community and Technical College System Board of Supervisors as part of its “commitment to academic and workforce training.” The tuition and fee rate freeze applies to all 12 of Louisiana’s Community and Technical Colleges, including CLTCC.

CLTCC tuition is $134 per credit hour. A student taking 12 semester hours would pay $1,608 in tuition. Fees vary and a student taking 12 semester hours would pay a total of approximately $2,050 in combined tuition and fees. With CLTCC’s open, no-cost textbook plan, many students can complete general education classes without any textbook expense, further reducing the cost of getting a workforce certificate or degree. “Today, a record number of CLTCC’s courses are transferable to sister Cenla colleges and universities which is a win-win for students”, Sawtelle said.

For information about enrollment visit http://www.CLTCC.edu/apply. For more information, contact the school via email at info@cltcc.edu or call 800-278-9855.

Central Louisiana Technical Community College (CLTCC) is a two-year technical and community college offering associate degrees, technical diplomas, industry certificates, and customized training in more than 20 disciplines to support local workforce development and prepare students for high-demand and high-wage careers. CLTCC serves 10 parishes in Central Louisiana through its eight campuses and provides instruction in one state prison and one federal correctional institution. For more information, visit www.cltcc.edu.


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NRMC PHARMACY IS OPEN DAILY – INCLUDING WEEKENDS

The drive through window at NRMC’s new retail pharmacy has become a popular place in recent weeks as community members take full advantage of its excellent customer service and convenience. Even when the Multi-specialty Clinic is closed, customers are able to utilize the Pharmacy Drive-thru until 8:30 each evening. The drive-thru is located on the backside of the Multispecialty Clinic off Isadore Street. From prescription medicine and easy refills to over-the-counter medications and supplies, the new Pharmacy is exceeding customer expectations.

Inside NRMC, patients are benefitting from the new Meds to Beds program. On the day of discharge from the hospital, patients have the option to have their “go home” prescriptions filled at the new pharmacy and delivered to them in their patient rooms. No more needing to stop at a pharmacy on the way home or asking family members to run back out and pick up a prescription for them that day.

Another advantage of the retail Pharmacy is the convenience of filling refills. With the pharmacy’s mobile app — RxLocal — customers can quickly and easily refill their prescription or communicate directly with the Pharmacy team.

From competitive pricing to acceptance of most insurances, the new Pharmacy focuses on customers’ needs. Most importantly, the Pharmacy team has the experience and expertise to set them apart. From consultations to assisting patients with complex medication needs, they provide exceptional service.

For more information, call 318.214.5777 or fax to 888-698-1529.

For a complete list of over-the-counter medicines and supplies available, visit http://www.NRMChospoital.org.


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Notice of Death – June 28, 2022

WINN:
Jaquita “Jackie” Ann Stewart
May 16, 1939 – June 27, 2022
Service: Thursday, June 30 at 10 am at Cornerstone Apostolic Church

Bobby Joe Bacle
June 1, 1944 – June 26, 2022
Service: Wednesday, June 29 at 10 am at Midway Baptist Church

Erlene Melton Smith
January 6, 1932 – June 26, 2022
Service: Wednesday, June 29 at 11 am at Southern Funeral Home

SABINE:
Linda Frances Johnson Harris
August 13, 1941 – June 28, 2022
Service: Friday, July 1 at 10 am at First Baptist Church of Pleasant Hill

Patsye Belisle Crocker
February 9, 1935 – June 24, 2022
Service: Thursday, June 30 at 11 am at First Methodist Church of Zwolle

Sharon Montang
December 8, 1953 – June 22, 2022
Service: Wednesday, June 29 at 3 pm at Oak Hill Baptist Church

Katherine M. Kezerle Sepulvado
January 22, 1928 – June 21, 2022
Service: Wednesday, June 29 at 10 am at St. Joseph Catholic Church


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Louisiana Trust for Historic Preservation Adds Two Winn Parish School Buildings to Endangered List

The Louisiana Trust for Historic Preservation released the list of endangered sites adding 14 this year; two of which are abandoned schools in Winn Parish.

Sikes High School (Sikes, Winn Parish, 1929) – This school replaced an earlier one-room schoolhouse when it was completed in 1929. It took only four months to build at about $40,000. Both the elementary school and high schools closed in the late 1980s and have sat vacant ever since. The Sikes Wolf Creek Handicraft Guild and the local Council on Aging are partnering to find ways to save this school. It needs major renovation and fundraising to restore it to a functional condition.

Winnfield Intermediate School (Winnfield, Winn Parish, 1928) – Originally built as the Winnfield High School, this educational landmark was constructed in 1928. It was designed by Herman J. Duncan and constructed by Tudor & Ratcliff, both of Alexandria. Much of Winnfield’s historic fabric has been lost and this school has become one of the last notable landmarks standing. Other modern schools have been built nearby and the last classes were held here in 2018. A building and community assessment are needed to determine its condition and potential new uses.

Since 1999, the Louisiana Trust for Historic Preservation has maintained the LOUISIANA’S MOST ENDANGERED PLACES LIST, and advocated to save these threatened sites. The list is created from people sending in nominations to include a site on the list. Sites are selected based on their historic integrity and the likelihood to bring about a positive resolution to their situation or to those of similar sites. 

Founded in 1979, the Louisiana Trust for Historic Preservation advocates promotes and preserves historic places representing our diverse culture. The founders understood that an organized state-wide network of preservationists was a critical component to promoting the preservation of the diverse culture and historic resources of Louisiana through education, technical assistance, outreach and advocacy.

The Louisiana Trust for Historic Preservation is the statewide partner of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

Sikes High School

Winnfield Intermediate School


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WPSB Committee Meetings Tonight

The Winn Parish School Board Committees will meet in a special called meeting Monday, June 27, 2022, at 5:00 PM in the meeting room of the Winn Parish School Board; for adopting insurance renewals.

WINN PARISH SCHOOL BOARD
Special Committee Meeting Agenda
June 27, 2022

A. Invocation
B. Pledge of Allegiance
C. Roll Call
D. Order of Business
E. Insurance Renewals -Property, EDP Coverage, Boiler & Machinery and Workers’ Compensation
F. Adjourn

WINN PARISH SCHOOL BOARD
Committees Appointed 2022

President: Michelle Carpenter
Vice President: Joe Lynn Browning

Executive
Joe Lynn Browning
Todd Martin
Michelle Carpenter

Finance and Budget
Joe Llaine Long, Chairman
Christy Harrell
Hany Scott
Patrick Howell
Todd Martin

Maintenance and Building
Joe Lynn Browning, Chairman
Leah Clingan
Lacey McManus
Harry Scott
Michael Riffe

Personnel and Salary
Christy Harrell, Chairman
Joe Lynn Browning
Carl Bryant
Todd Martin
Michael Riffe

Academics and Instruction
Joe Llaine Long, Chairman
Carl Bryant
Leah Clingan
Patrick Howell
Lacey McManus

Land and Timber
Joe Lynn Browning, Chairman
Todd Martin
Patrick Howell

Insurance Claim Review
Todd Martin, Chairman
Leah Clingan
Lacey McManus

WINN PARISH SCHOOL BOARD
Committee Meeting Agenda
June 27, 2022

Academics and Instruction – Long, Bryant, Clingan, Howell, McManus
1. Summer School Report
2. Facility Usage

Finance and Budget – Long, Harrell, Howell, Martin, Scott
1. School Food Service

Personnel and Salary – Harrell, Browning, Bryant, Martin, Riffe
1. Staffing 2022-23

Executive – Carpenter, Browning, Martin
1. Set Agenda


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Winnfield Police Department Arrest Report

Date: 6-20-22
Name: Corey Sonier
Address: Winnfield, LA
Race: Black
Sex: Male
Age: 32
Charge: Theft

Date: 6-20-22
Name: Keisha Fobbs
Address: Jonesboro, LA
Race: Black
Sex: Female
Age: 32
Charge: Theft

Date: 6-23-22
Name: Demetria White
Address: Winnfield, LA
Race: N/A
Sex: N/A
Age: 32
Charge: Obscenity

THIS INFORMATION HAS BEEN PROVIDED BY A LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCY AS PUBLIC INFORMATION. PERSONS NAMED OR SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPHS OR VIDEO AS SUSPECTS IN A CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION, OR ARRESTED AND CHARGED WITH A CRIME, HAVE NOT BEEN CONVICTED OF ANY CRIMINAL OFFENSE AND ARE PRESUMED INNOCENT UNTIL PROVEN GUILTY IN A COURT OF LAW.


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