Registration for Pee Wee Flag Football Extended

The City of Winnfield Recreation Department registration for the Pee Wee Flag Football League is open! 

Boys and girls ages 4-12 are eligible for this exciting program. The registration fee is $40 per application. The registration deadline is Friday, September 17th.

Late registration will be held Monday, September 20th – Friday, September 24th and will be $50 per application. 

Tryouts will be held Saturday, September 18th at the Grove Street Recreation Center on Field #2. Tryout times for each age group will be posted at a later date. 

For more information concerning flag football please contact the City of Winnfield Recreation Department at 318-628-3413.


Register Now for Shop with a Cop’s Annual Motorcycle Ride this Saturday

Donate and Sponsor a Child

Shop with a Cop is having its annual motorcycle ride fundraiser Saturday, September 25, 2021. Registration is at 9 AM and kickstands up at 10 AM. 

The approximately 110 mile ride will begin at the Winnfield Police Department located at 405 S. Jones St., Winnfield, LA 71483. 

After the ride burgers, hotdogs or sausage on a bun will be served at the Winnfield Police Department. 

$30 per bike/rider is free/includes lunch. Those not registering or riding may still enjoy lunch for $5.

All proceeds go to the less fortunate children (picked by local schools) who are all given a special amount of money and escorted by a first responder, police official and firemen to pick out their own Christmas gifts.

For more information please contact the Winnfield Police Department 318-628-3511 or Michelle Nugent 318-413-0344


Remember This? Can You Open This?

By: Brad Dison

For centuries, humans have looked for ways to preserve food. Common methods for preserving meat included salting, drying and smoking, which made it easy to store or transport. Preserving other food varieties proved more difficult.

Warring parties struggled to keep their armies fed. Battles were usually fought in the summer and early fall when food was easily replenished. Both sides understood that winter battles were rare because of the lack of food. In many cases, soldiers returned to their homes for the winter and regrouped in the spring. Napoleon Bonaparte was largely responsible for changing that aspect of warfare.

In the first decade of the nineteenth century, Napoleon’s French Army and its allies fought in what is referred to as the Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815). One of Napoleon’s main difficulties was keeping his quarter of a million soldiers fed. It was Napoleon who said, “An army marches on its stomach,” which means that to be effective an army needs a constant supply of good food. If Napoleon could find a way to keep his soldiers fed, they could continue to fight year-round. This tactic would give Napoleon the advantage.

In the early years of the Napoleonic Wars, the French government offered a prize of 12,000 francs to anyone who could devise an inexpensive method for the preservation of large amounts of food. In 1809, French confectioner Nicolas Appert displayed bottles of fruits and vegetables preserved in sealed glass bottles. The food only spoiled if the seal was broken. Appert, who is considered the father of canning, won the prize on the condition that he would share his process with the public. The process was slow, expensive, and the bottles were easily broken. The Napoleonic Wars ended before the canning process was perfected.

In 1810, British merchant Peter Durand patented the first process to seal food in cans rather than in glass bottles. In 1811, a Londoner named Bryan Donkin bought Durand’s patent, developed Appert’s process further, and packaged food in sealed air-tight cans made from tinned wrought iron. The process was still expensive as each can was made one at a time by hand at a rate of about six per hour. Eating the expensive canned foods became a status symbol for the upper crust to flaunt their wealth. Although canned food was too expensive for ordinary citizens, the British Army and Royal Navy provided canned food for its men. Wars remained the main demand for canned food.

Hungry people used varying methods to get into the cans with varying success. The cans were so tough that manufacturers printed instructions on each can explaining the method to open them with a hammer and chisel. Soldiers on the battlefield often cut their hands and fingers as they struggled with their bayonets and knives to open the cans. Another common method was to smash the cans with whatever was handy, which usually resulted in spillage of most of the can’s contents.

In the early 1850s, manufacturers began using steel rather than wrought iron in their cans. The steel cans were thinner, lighter, and easier to open. As the thinner cans became more common, clerks in grocery stores opened cans for customers to take home.

In 1858, Ezra J. Warner patented the first practical can opener, which was little more than a blade that cut into the lid. The user repeated the cuts all the way around the can in a sawing fashion until the lid was able to be opened enough to get the contents out. It’s hard to believe that the first can opener was invented almost 50 years after the invention of the tin can. The standard toothed wheel can opener, the one found in most homes today, was invented in 1926, over 110 years after the tin can was first patented.

Sources:

1. Eschner, Kat. “Why the Can Opener Wasn’t Invented Until Almost 50 Years After the Can.” Smithsonian Magazine. August 24, 2017. smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/why-can-opener-wasnt-invented-until-almost-50-years-after-can-180964590/.

2. Wisdom Biscuits. “How Did People Open Cans Before Can Openers Were Invented?.” Accessed September 18, 2021. wisdombiscuits.com/how-did-people-open-cans-before-can-openers-were-invented/.


Biden Plan Includes Devastating Tax Increases on Family Farms

By: Royal Alexander/Opinion

The combined tax rate could add up to a fatal 61% on inherited wealth, eliminating family farms (and many other small businesses) and consolidating all American agriculture into a handful of very large corporate farming enterprises that are easier for government to control.  (As we know, Socialism forbids the age-old right of private property, which is what confiscatory taxation seeks to attain.  No better reference may be made than to Karl Marx himself who said in The Communist Manifesto that, “the theory of the communists may be summed up in the single sentence: abolition of private property.” (Heritage Foundation)).

American farmers, and farming, have been an integral and foundational part of our nation’s history and development since its founding.  The American farmer not only predominantly feeds our country but many parts of the world as well.  Why we would ever threaten medium and smaller-sized American farmers completely escapes me.  Why we would ever trust foreign food sources for our food—as idiotic as trusting foreign oil provided by foreign nations who despise us to supply our nation’s energy needs—is very difficult to understand.

In our beloved Louisiana, our agricultural industry is hugely important.  Louisiana farmers create and manage one of the economic pillars of our state economy.   In fact, Louisiana farmers are fabulous producers of corn, cotton, sugarcane, soybeans, beef, poultry, fish, sweet potatoes and rice among several others.  (LA. Dept. of Wildlife and Fisheries).  Further, about 60% of Louisiana’s agricultural income is generated by crops while the other 40% is produced by livestock and livestock products.   In terms of income generated, the state’s top five agricultural products are sugarcane, rice, cattle and calves, soybeans, and cotton.  About 9% of Louisiana’s agricultural revenues are generated by cattle and calves.  Dairy products, aquaculture (farm raised catfish and crawfish), chicken eggs and hogs are also important sources of revenue.  Sweet potatoes and tomatoes are the most important vegetable crops, and peaches, strawberries and melons lead the fruit crops. (LA. economy/Netstate.com).

However, the critically important, generational impact of family farms across the nation and in Louisiana is threatened in President Biden’s $1.8 trillion so-called infrastructure bill.  How so? Well, in order to pay for his multi trillion-dollar expansion of social programs and Green New Deal projects, (or more accurately to create the illusion that it is being paid for), President Biden has included massive tax increases and one of them will impose a real hardship and likely the elimination of many of America’s approximately 2 million family farms.

In simplest terms, the bill proposes taking away what is referred to for tax purposes as the “stepped up in basis” on inherited farms and businesses.  Some experts have concluded that a typical Iowa farm, for example, will be hit with $680,000 in new taxes—or a 40% tax, the payment of which may cost, and kill, the farm itself.  (Americans for Tax Reform).

Simply stated, this tax plan calls for nearly doubling the top tax rate on capital gains and eliminating a significant tax benefit on appreciated assets.  For example, if someone dies after starting a business decades ago that’s now worth $100 million, under the current tax law, the business would pass to family members with no capital gains tax because the cost basis of the business is “stepped up” to its current value at death.  However, under this Biden plan, the heirs would immediately owe a capital gains tax of $42.96 million based on the capital gains tax rate of $39.6 %, plus the net investment income tax of 3.8%, minus the $1 million estate tax exemption.  This proposal would reduce the estate tax exemption from $11.7 million to only $1 million!   When the estate tax is added and all the numbers are crunched and sorted out, these family farmer-heirs would owe a whopping $61.1 million on the original $100 million inheritance. (This, of course, does not include state capital gains and state estate taxes). (AP).  This is a staggering redistribution of wealth.

Even prominent Democrats are concerned about the death of family farms.  House Agriculture Committee Chairman David Scott (D-Ga.) sent a letter to Biden stating:

“I have serious concerns about proposed changes in tax provisions that could hurt our family farmers, ranchers and small businesses.

I am very concerned that proposals to pay for these investments could partially come on the backs of our food, fiber, and fuel producers.  In particular, “step-up in basis” is a critical tool enabling family farming operations to continue from generation to generation.  The potential for capital gains to be imposed on heirs at death of the landowner would impose a significant financial burden on these operations.   Additionally, my understanding of the exemptions is that they would just delay the tax liability for those continuing the farming operation until time of sale, which could result in further consolidation in farmland ownership.  This would make it more difficult for young, beginning, and socially disadvantaged farmers to get into farming. 

While I appreciate that the proposal provides for some exemptions, the provisions could still result in significant tax burdens on many family farming operations.”

Further, consider the Wall Street Journal Op-Ed of Iowa Senator Chuck Grassley.  Grassley wrote:

“I introduced Arley Wilson, who schooled policy makers on the impracticality and inefficiency of the tax law… and explained how its application on top of the estate tax would be the ‘death knell’ for family farms and small businesses.  Among other issues, it would require complex reconstruction of the decedent’s assets, give rise to extended audits, and trigger litigation for next of kin.  Eliminating step-up in basis is another post-death tax grab, adding punitive taxes on thrift, savings and investments.  Congress (which tried to eliminate “step up basis” before in the 1970s) realized its mistake and voted in 1978 to suspend carryover basis and repeal it in 1980—both with then-Sen. Biden’s support.  He’s forgotten the lesson he should have learned.” (Parenthetical added).

Four decades later Democrats want to dismantle a century-old tax law that has stitched the economic and social fabric of American agriculture together for generations.  The 1921 Revenue Act codified step-up in basis at death.  It has allowed property and livelihoods to be passed on to the next generation without a confiscatory tax.” (Grassley, WSJ).

As noted by tax lawyer, Robert W. Woods, “under current tax law, assets that pass directly to your heirs get a step-up in basis for income tax purposes.  It doesn’t matter if you pay estate tax when you die or not.  For generations, assets held at death get a stepped-up basis—to market value—when you die.  Small businesses count on this. Biden’s proposal would tax an asset’s unrealized appreciation at transfer.  You mean Junior gets taxed whether or not he sells the business? Essentially, yes. The idea that you could build up your small business and escape death tax and income tax to pass it to your kids is on the chopping block.  Biden would levy a tax on unrealized appreciation of assets passed on at death.  By taxing the unrealized gain at death, heirs would get hit at the transfer, regardless of whether they sell the asset.” (Forbes, Robert W. Woods).

It is appalling; it is insane that President Biden would eliminate the stepped-up basis.  This is in addition to his desire to raise the federal corporate tax rate to a higher-than-China rate of 28% and to impose the highest capital gains tax since Jimmy Carter in 1977.  His plan would hit nearly 2 million family farms (and many, many other small businesses) while Americans are still reeling, struggling to recover from the pandemic.

The views and opinions expressed in the My Opinion article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of The Winn Parish Journal. Any content provided by the authors is of their opinion and is not intended to malign any religion, ethnic group, club, organization, company, individual or anyone or anything.


Wyatt Manor Nursing and Rehabilitation Center Now Hiring

The time to be awesome is now!

Wyatt Manor Nursing and Rehabilitation Center is hiring a Director of Nursing and LPN’s for all shifts at our long term care facility in Jonesboro, LA.

  • Director of Nursing position – RN Required, salary and benefit package commensurate with experience.
  • LPN positions – Licensed Practical Nurse certification required

Please call Ron Frazier at 318-259-3290 for more information.


Notice of Death September 21, 2021

NATCHITOCHES:
Michelle Ann O’Donnell
May 09, 1969 – September 17, 2021
Service: Saturday, September 25 at 10 am at Blanchard-St. Denis Funeral Home

Joseph Lynch
September 20, 2021
Arrangements TBA

James Clark
September 21, 2021
Arrangements TBA

James “J.C” Coutee, Sr.
March 12, 1962 – September 16, 2021
Service: Wednesday, September 22 at 2 pm at Bay Springs Baptist Church

Cyldia B. Groce
September 17, 2021
Arrangements TBA

John Jackson Sr.
September 15, 2021
Arrangements TBA

Ricky Lane Carpenter
May 27, 1961 – September 14, 2021
Service: Saturday, September 25 at 11 am at Fern Park Cemetery in Natchitoches

Gloria Shields
September 12, 2021
Arrangements TBA

Felenn Sowell
September 08, 2021
Arrangements TBA

Minnie Johnson
September 04, 2021
Arrangements TBA

SABINE:
James Rickey Hebert
May 20, 1963 – September 12, 2021
Service: Saturday, September 25 at 10 am at Spring Ridge Baptist Church

RED RIVER:
Suzanne Marie Bumgardner
February 13, 1954 – September 18, 2021
Service: Wednesday, September 22 at 10 am at Ashland Baptist Church

Stanley Derrell Horton
October 28, 1938 – September 19, 2021
Service: Friday, September 24 at 11 am at Open Door Fellowship Church


Shop with a Cop Annual Motorcycle Ride Saturday, September 25th

Donate and Sponsor a Child

Shop with a Cop is having its annual motorcycle ride fundraiser Saturday, September 25, 2021. Registration is at 9 AM and kickstands up at 10 AM. 

The approximately 110 mile ride will begin at the Winnfield Police Department located at 405 S. Jones St., Winnfield, LA 71483. 

After the ride burgers, hotdogs or sausage on a bun will be served at the Winnfield Police Department. 

$30 per bike/rider is free/includes lunch. Those not registering or riding may still enjoy lunch for $5.

All proceeds go to the less fortunate children (picked by local schools) who are all given a special amount of money and escorted by a first responder, police official and firemen to pick out their own Christmas gifts.

For more information please contact the Winnfield Police Department 318-628-3511 or Michelle Nugent 318-413-0344


Rotary Club of Winnfield Learns about Fighting Wild Fires from U.S. Forester Brad Cooper

As the guest of Rotary Club of Winnfield’s President Jodi Taylor, local U. S. Forest Ranger Brad Cooper talked about his experiences fighting wildfires in Montana this past summer at the Club’s meeting on September 15, 2021.

Mr. Cooper has been with the local district of the U. S. Forest Service for 2-1/2 years, after working in Arizona for several years. He enjoys living and working here in the southeastern party of the country, but he had an exciting summer spending much of his time fighting wildfires in Montana.

All forest rangers are of course trained to fight forest fires, and must fight wildfires in their own districts. Many forest rangers volunteer to help fight wildfires in other national forest districts, in light of the large numbers of people, equipment and supplies required to extinguish large wildfires primarily occurring in the northwestern part of the U.S. and California. Indeed, nine other rangers from this district went west to fight wildfires on national forest lands this summer, along with a fire engine as well.

In July, Cooper was sent to assist in fighting wildfire in the Helena-Lewis and Clark National Forest near Helena in the central part of Montana. He said 50 to 55 people on his team were dedicated to fighting a cluster of four fires in those two national forests, from the command section to those who are physically engaged in extinguishing the fire to the people who set up and break down the camps, cook for the camp, to those in logistics—this last group brings in all the equipment and supplies needed to fight fires and keep the firefighters going.

Brad was the command section’s liaison officer, responsible for working with local authorities on such matters as recommending evacuations and the like. In this capacity, he was also the COVID-19 coordinator, working with the county health department to develop and implement a COVID plan and protocol for persons in the camp who contracted COVID. He supervised anywhere from four to ten medics and ambulance personnel, and developed a protocol for isolating and treating anyone who came down with COVID. These fires were going for 70 days and affected over 48,000 acres.

Cooper returned home on July 31, and a few days later, he was dispatched to Montana again to help fight a complex of wildfires, started by lightning, across the Lolo National Forest about 2-1/2 hours west of Helena. In this area the forest service had the assistance of about 200 National Guard troops. He said these troops did what they were already trained to do, and were also trained up during their assignment specifically in fighting forest fires. Fortunately for the COVID coordinator as well as the people in his camps, neither of Mr. Cooper’s camps had any cases of COVID-19. Several firefighting camps elsewhere had hundreds of people who contracted COVID.

Fire fighter safety is the top priority in fighting wildfires, according to Cooper. “If we can’t put firefighters in an area safely, we don’t put them in,” he said. The acreage of national forests involved in wildfires increases every year, and the expense of fighting them increases every year as well. It is becoming harder and harder to fill positions on fires because of the COVID epidemic, the fact that fewer people are willing to fight forest fires, and the steadily-increasing number of wildfires in the western part of the United States.

In the Southern area of the National Forest Service, we have fires only about every ten years or so, according to Cooper, whereas the northwest area and California experience many wildfires every year. “We use preventive measures here which are not used in the west,” he said, such as prescribed burns, clearing undergrowth, fire retardant, and dozers.

What can property owners do to prevent fire damage to their own property? Keep the “Wildland Urban Interface” (WUI)—groups of homes and other structures in close proximity to national forest land—clear of brush and other inflammatory material, clean up or move debris and “stuff” away from houses and buildings, and stack firewood away from houses and other buildings. Cooper’s thought: “It’s better to have to go some distance from the house to get your firewood,” than to leave things which catch fire easily very close to your house.

The forest service has an incident website which can be accessed by the public through inciweb.nwcg.gov providing information about active wildfires across the country being battled by teams of the National Forest Service. You can search by the name of the incident, type (wildfire, prescribed fire, burned area emergency response), state in which the national forest area on fire is located, or size (number of acres involved in the fire). The incident overview tells specific location of the burning area, what is currently occurring with the fire, areas identified for evacuations of residents, the team managing the fire, and public use restrictions in the area. The incident information is updated as frequently as every five minutes when the situation is changing quickly, and less often as developments occur over longer and longer periods of time. Also interesting to note, each incident has its own assigned meteorologist with the National Weather Service.

Upon completion of Mr. Cooper’s talk, questions and answers flew, and the meeting was then adjourned with the Rotary motto: “Service above self!”


Winn Parish Police Jury Regular Meeting Tonight

Winn Parish Police Jury will hold a Regular Meeting, Monday, September 20, 2021, at 119 West Main Street, Parish Courthouse Room 112, Winnfield, La. at 5:00 p.m.

AGENDA

I. Call to Order.
II. Invocation and Pledge.
III. Amendments or deletions.
IV. Adoption of Agenda.
V. Adoption of Minutes-August 16, 2021-Regular Meeting, August 26, 2021-Building & Grounds Committee Meeting and September 13, 2021-Special Called Meeting.
VI. Announcements and Comments.
1. Mr. Perry Holmes, Road Superintendent-to give a road update.
VII. GUESTS:
None.
VIII. BUSINESS:

  1. Mr. Kirk Miles-Motion to approve monthly invoices.
    –Motion to Adopt a Resolution giving President Joshua McAllister authority to sign all documents pertaining to Capital Outlay Roadway Reconstruction on Lum Fox and Zion Hill Church Roads.
    –Motion to Adopt a Resolution to dedicate $225,000 in American Rescue Plan Act funds to Tannehill Water System.
  2. Mr. Frank McLaren-Motion to Adopt a Resolution giving President Joshua McAllister authority to sign all documents pertaining to Capital Outlay Roadway Reconstruction on Old Alexandria Road.
    –Motion to Adopt a Resolution to dedicate $50,000 in American Rescue Plan Act funds to Atlanta Water System.
  3. Mr. Author Robinson–Motion of Intent to reduce the speed limit to 15 MPH on Womack Road.
    –Motion to Adopt a Resolution to dedicate $100,000 in American Rescue Plan Act funds to Pleasant Hill Water System.
  4.  Mrs. Tammy Griffin-Motion of Intent to Adopt a Winn Parish Ordinance for sale and use of fireworks.
  5. Mr. Phillip Evans-Motion to Adopt a Resolution to dedicate $142,000 in American Rescue Plan Act funds to Wheeling Water System.
    –Motion to advertise for bids on road materials and supplies for calendar year 2022.
  6. Mr. Joshua McAllister-Motion to Appoint Mr. Glen Jones to the Saline Lake Commission for a 4 year term (to fill the vacancy left by Mr. Buck Carter’s resignation).
    –Motion to Adopt a Resolution engaging Strategic Demographics, LLC in accordance with contract proposal for reapportionment and redistricting services.
    –Motion to Adopt a Resolution to dedicate $117,000 in American Rescue Plan Act funds to West Winn Water System.

IX. Announcements and Comments:


Deer Hunters, Taxidermists Can Win Gift Card Prizes By Helping LDWF Monitor for Chronic Wasting Disease

Deer hunters and state taxidermists will be entered into a contest for $1,000 and $500 gift cards, respectively, when they submit a sample from a mature buck harvested in the 2021-22 deer season in Louisiana, the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) announced. 

All submitted samples will be tested for chronic wasting disease (CWD), assisting LDWF with their surveillance monitoring for this disease, which is 100-percent fatal in deer.

The prizes are made possible by the South Louisiana Branch of the National Deer Association, assisting the efforts of LDWF to increase surveillance for CWD.

Hunters become eligible to win the $1,000 gift card by submitting a sample to LDWF for testing from a mature buck harvested in Louisiana during the 2021-22 deer season.

Taxidermists will be entered to win the $500 gift card by submitting samples from mature bucks harvested in Louisiana during the 2021-22 deer season. Both drawings will be held March 18, 2022.

Participants are asked to contact their local LDWF Field Office to submit a sample. For more information and complete contest rules go to https://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/page/cwd-contest.

CWD, a fatal neurologic disease of deer, has not been detected in Louisiana. However, all three neighboring states, Texas, Arkansas, and Mississippi, have reported positive tests. Continued sampling throughout the state remains vitally important and LDWF is asking hunters to help. 

The disease is spread by contact with infected saliva, blood, urine, feces, food, water, and soil. It can be transmitted from live animals or carcasses, and creates holes in the brain tissue of infected animals. Infection with CWD can occur in deer of any sex and age, but higher infection rates are typically noted in mature bucks.

Symptoms can show 16 months or more after infection. Those symptoms include weight loss, excessive salivation, teeth grinding, head tremors, difficulty swallowing, excessive urination and thirst, incoordination, splay leg stance, lowered head and ears, fixed stare, fainting and lack of awareness.

Prior to hunting deer, all deer hunters, regardless of age or license status, must obtain deer tags and have tags in possession when hunting deer. Immediately upon harvesting a deer, the hunter must tag the deer with the appropriate license tag before it is moved from the harvest site. 

The hunter must record the date of harvest and the parish on the carcass tag. Within 72 hours, the hunter must validate the harvest online using the LDWF website.

For more information, contact Johnathan Bordelon at 318-487-5885 or jbordelon@wlf.la.gov . For more information on CWD, go to https://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/page/cwd.


Wyatt Manor Nursing and Rehabilitation Center Now Hiring

The time to be awesome is now!

Wyatt Manor Nursing and Rehabilitation Center is hiring a Director of Nursing and LPN’s for all shifts at our long term care facility in Jonesboro, LA.

  • Director of Nursing position – RN Required, salary and benefit package commensurate with experience.
  • LPN positions – Licensed Practical Nurse certification required

Please call Ron Frazier at 318-259-3290 for more information.


Notice of Death September 19, 2021

NATCHITOCHES:
James “J.C” Coutee, Sr.
March 12, 1962 – September 16, 2021
Service: Wednesday, September 22 at 2 pm at Bay Springs Baptist Church

Cyldia B. Groce
September 17, 2021
Arrangements TBA

Cheryl Ann Jeter Choate
March 08, 1953 – September 15, 2021
Service: Monday, September 20 at 6 pm in the chapel of Blanchard-St. Denis Funeral Home

John Jackson Sr.
September 15, 2021
Arrangements TBA

Ricky Lane Carpenter
May 27, 1961 – September 14, 2021
Service: Saturday, September 25 at 11 am at Fern Park Cemetery in Natchitoches

Gloria Shields
September 12, 2021
Arrangements TBA

Felenn Sowell
September 08, 2021
Arrangements TBA

Minnie Johnson
September 04, 2021
Arrangements TBA

SABINE:
James Rickey Hebert
May 20, 1963 – September 12, 2021
Service: Saturday, September 25 at 10 am at Spring Ridge Baptist Church

Wendolyn Faye Berry
March 17, 1959 – September 16, 2021
Service: Monday, September 20 at 2 pm at St. John The Baptist Catholic Church

Linda Dianne Laroux
May 14, 1958 – September 15, 2021
Service: Monday, September 20 at 10 am at Warren Meadows Funeral Home in Zwolle